StartWire Unveils Talent Community Xcelerator

April 6th, 2017 No comments

New Solution from Recruiting Technology Leader Populates Talent Communities with Opted-In Job Candidates

LEBANON, NH–(Marketwired – Apr 5, 2017) – StartWire, America’s number one job search organizer, today announced the release of Talent Community Xcelerator. Designed for organizations with existing talent communities or candidate relationship marketing programs, StartWire Talent Community Xcelerator creates a new acquisition channel for targeted candidate leads by integrating the employer’s opt-in with StartWire’s registration process.

StartWire is already used by more than 11 million job seekers. The award-winning free service has been lauded for advancing the candidate experience by providing them with automatic status updates from thousands of employers regarding their job applications.

StartWire Talent Community Xcelerator

With the launch of Talent Community Xcelerator, StartWire enhances its employer-side tools. Talent communities are major investments in time and money and are often only promoted on the employer’s owned assets such as the career site and social media channels. Now, organizations can leverage Talent Community Xcelerator to target job seekers by location, occupation, education or salary, and offer an easy way to join the employer’s talent community with just one click. This approach presents a win-win for everyone, as job seekers get connected to employers they are interested in, and employers increase the reach and value of their talent communities.

CRM and talent community software providers can also partner with StartWire to offer Talent Community Xcelerator to their clients who may be looking for additional ways to grow their candidate databases. Talent Community Xcelerator can easily be integrated into most platforms and provides another tool for technology vendors to improve the ROI of their software and deepen relationships with their clients.

StartWire president Andrew Katz commented, “StartWire’s unique registration process allows us to interact with candidates who are interested in learning about new opportunities. With StartWire Talent Community Xcelerator, employers can detail the skills they anticipate needing for current and future openings — from warehouse workers to electrical engineers and every discipline in between — and receive only those candidates matching their criteria.” He continued, “StartWire has earned the trust of candidates and employers alike through our continual communications to confirm alignment.”

Heading StartWire Talent Community Xcelerator is Harold Levy, vice president, Business Development. Levy has more than 30 years of recruitment marketing experience, having held executive roles at TMP Worldwide, Bernard Hodes/Omnicom, Bayard and Korn Ferry. Given his expertise, Levy is able to guide StartWire clients’ talent community acquisition strategies and ensure measurable results.

Levy shared, “StartWire Talent Community Xcelerator solution addresses the requirements of multiple audiences: the candidates who want to learn about relevant openings; the employers that need to build communities of qualified candidates; and other vendors — such as CRM and TRM providers — seeking high quality data services to augment their technology solutions.”

To learn more about StartWire Talent Community Xcelerator, please contact Harold Levy by emailing harold.levy@startdatelabs.com.

About StartWire
StartWire is America’s number one job search organizer with more than 11 million members. Job seekers across the U.S. turn to StartWire to close the “resume black hole” by receiving automatic status updates from thousands of employers. Since its inception, StartWire has received rave reviews and coverage in US News & World Report, The Wall Street Journal, CNN, TechCrunch, Mashable, ERE, and Human Resource Executive. StartWire is headquartered near Dartmouth College in Lebanon, NH. For more information, visit https://www.startwire.com.

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Unemployed? 6 Tips to Help

May 11th, 2016 No comments

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I’m tired of the job search. Nothing is working. This job search is taking too long.

Are these your thoughts? Unwilling unemployment is stressful, tiring, and discouraging. For those struggling with long-term unemployment, here are some tips that can help you change your job search tactic and outlook.

1. Choose a functional resume over a chronological one.

This type of resume takes the focus out of the years you’ve worked and instead puts the focus on relevant skill sets. For example, if the position is looking for someone with strong writing experience, a functional resume will list “Writing/Editing Content” at the top of the resume. Then all work experience related to writing will follow. This type of resume takes the focus away from years worked and instead addresses how your skills match the prospective position. To view a sample of both functional and chronological resumes, here’s a guide on resume construction.

2. Fill in those unemployment gaps with activity.

It’s important to show that you’ve been actively pursuing other ventures and strengthening your skills during your time of unemployment. Find yourself a project to get involved in, whether it be a charity you’re interested in or a non-profit company that’s looking for volunteers.

Do something that shows you are self-employed and assertive. This can help fill in those resume gaps and show employers that you’ve been productive with your time, giving them the assurance that you can smoothly transition from your current project to the ones within the new role.

3. Don’t over explain.

If employers ask about your unemployment, keep it short and simple. Over-explaining tends to give away more information than necessary. You want to address the employer’s question on your unemployment, but the key is to take the conversation away from the past and bring it to the future. To do this, talk about projects you’ve been involved in, then link that to how skills acquired from the project can transition to fit your new role.

4. Strive for efficiency. Quality over quantity.

Don’t apply to any available job listing, thinking that casting a wide net will cause one of them to eventually bite. This is wasting precious time and resources. Instead, use your resources to apply for targeted job listings. The general rule of thumb is, if you meet 70% of the job description, apply.

5. Pitch yourself to old employers.

Your old employers are the ones who may know your background and work style better than new ones. If you left the company on a good note, it’s okay and can be strategic to just go back to that company and ask for a contract or freelance position. Frame it in a way that shows your expert knowledge of the company and use your previous experience working there as leverage to market yourself as a safe hire. Most companies see newer candidates as risky investments because they lack familiarity in the candidate and their overall work ethic. However, previous candidates that have been successful, but let go due to budget constraints, may be good investments for contract or freelance openings.

6. Change your outlook

Don’t blame yourself and don’t be discouraged. Being long-term unemployed can be stressful, but this stress fuels a vicious cycle where you enter an interview feeling stressed and anxious to get the job. Employers pick up on this anxiety and therefore, become less likely to hire you. Clear your mind, stay positive, and learn how to manage job search frustration. Look within your community and join a job group with people in your similar situation. You might be surprised to find that this can be a great space of mutual support and advice sharing.

The Salary Question During an Interview

April 7th, 2016 No comments

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Q: How do I answer when I’m asked about my salary preferences?

A: This question is tricky because answer too high and you’ll seem too expensive of a candidate. Answer too low and you’re effectively selling yourself short.

Before you go into any interview, whether it be through phone or in person, make sure you perform a quick research of the position you’re interviewing for. Check your salary estimates using sites such as glassdoor.com, salary.com or payscale.com. Unfortunately, not all of these are accurate based on the level of experience you have and the importance of your skills relative to that company, so be sure not to base your salary entirely on these estimates. However, definitely use these sites as a good reference point.

Next, always answer this question as a range. For example, saying that your salary expectations are 40,000 to 50,000 broadens your chances of answering within the range that the employer is willing to offer. Be prepared to receive an offer towards the lower side of your range. If this is not something you’re willing to accept, don’t say that lower range just for the purpose of having a range.

If possible, deflect the question if you are at an early stage of the interview. Put the focus on understanding the job requirements instead by saying, I’d love to learn more about this job’s requirements and how well I meet these needs before discussing salary. Another approach is to try and ask them what kind of range they’re offering instead. Say, I’m sure you’ve budgeted a salary range for this position and I’m certain we’ll reach an agreement if I am your preferred candidate. What is this budgeted range?

Finally, make sure you practice answering this question. Money talks are always sensitive subjects, so to prevent yourself from choking up during the interview, practice before hand.

To brush up on other interview related skills, read on for some more interviewing tips!

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How to Determine Company Culture

March 21st, 2016 No comments

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Q: How can I figure out the company culture and whether it’s a right fit for me?

A: To best tell a company’s culture, ask questions. During the interview, play detective and search for attributes that would be a good cultural fit for you.

First, figure out the elements that would help you succeed in a company. Do you prefer a culture that is highly social where co-workers spend time together inside and outside of the office? Or do you perform better in an environment where there is quiet space for you to focus entirely on work? Do you like working in a highly individualistic and competitive environment or do you prefer one that is more collaborative with group decisions? Understanding what you prefer is the first step to identifying a specific company’s unique culture.

Once you understand your side of the equation, start to investigate your prospective company’s with questions that help uncover culture:

1) How often are decisions made in group settings?

2) How often do people collaborate in team projects?/ How often does the staff meet?

3) What attributes would make me successful in this work environment?

4) How would you describe your company culture in 3 words?

5) Who are your mentors?

6) What ways do employers achieve work life balance?

7) What activities or sponsorships do the company hold?

8) How is performance feedback given to employees?

 Make simple observations of your setting during the interview as well. Take a look at your surroundings and observe the dress code. Are people dressed in business professional attire or casual clothing? Do you see any family photos? Take a look at the makeup of your co-workers. Does your employer value diversity?

Other ways to discover a company’s culture is through social media! Take a look at the company’s Facebook or Twitter pages. There might be pictures posted about social events or casual Fridays.

Have more questions? Read on for tips on how to answer the salary question during an interview, best times of day to schedule an interview, and more.

 

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Jobs – Using the Gig Economy to Your Advantage

February 11th, 2016 No comments

© Can Stock Photo Inc. / Antonio_DiazThe gig economy is defining jobs today.

The gig economy–if you’ve had your ear to the ground s at any point in the past few years, you may have heard the term bandied about. Those in consulting or creative fields may be nodding your heads, but the concept is still new to many.

“Now,” say the non-musicians among you, “why would I be interested in gigs?”

In many cases, the gig economy is mediated by mobile technology, especially smartphone apps and intelligent websites that match you to gigs based on your preferences. Freelancing is the name of the game–for example, an Uber driver is an independent contractor using the app.

What Does it Mean for You?

Freelancers are nothing new, but the gig economy makes it easier than ever to be one yourself. The gig economy allows you to be flexible. Whether you want to supplement your income or tide yourself over while continuing your search for more stable employment, there’s something for everyone. A key feature of a gig job is the ability to define your own hours. An Uber driver picks up fares until they’re satisfied, which allows them to slot it in to any busy schedule.

Some people take so well to the gig economy that it ends up becoming their primary source of income. For self-starters and independent spirits, it’s a godsend. These people have diverse streams of income and have wide skill sets. Some apps, like the Bay Area-based Josephine, are for those with a passion about the gig. Josephine is for your inner chef, allowing you to share your passion with others.

For those who are between traditional employment, the gig economy presents a safety cushion that has not been available in the past. With the overall higher quality of the gigs, and the flexibility described above, it can make the time between jobs a little less stressful.

Still others add to their existing income with gigs, keeping their streams of income flowing from many different rivers. Even if you’re employed already, the opt-in nature of gigs can add to income from traditional sources. There’s no wrong way to take advantage of the gig economy!

Some noteworthy examples of the gig economy:

AirBnb

Caviar

Fiverr

Luxe

Lyft

Swifto

Uber

Upwork

Happy New Year from StartWire!

January 8th, 2016 No comments

© Can Stock Photo Inc. / PaltoThe first week of the new year has come and gone! StartWire wishes health, happiness, and success to jobseekers and employers alike. Here’s to a great year.

Dos and Don’ts: When Yankee Swap Goes Bad

December 18th, 2015 No comments

© Can Stock Photo Inc. / AleutieMy mother once related to me a story of a Yankee swap gone awry: having gone first and at the mercy of her coworkers, she ended up with a first aid kit from the Ted, the weird guy in accounting.

Whether you’re stressing about the company party’s Yankee swap or still searching for a job, Christmas gifts are always a challenge to select. Never fear, for StartWire and friends have some ideas to help stoke the holiday cheer!

Jobs2Careers recently published a list of 25 sure-fire hits for when you’re stumped. You may even be tempted to get yourself a little something off this list!

If you’re of a more surreal bent, check out CareerBuilder’s list of some of the weirdest gifts exchanged at the workplace. Ceramic dress-up sheep for everyone!

Above all, a Christmas gift should be memorable. ThinkGeek is a great place for gifts to capture your nerdy fancy. A deep delve into the recesses of Amazon can also reveal some truly unusual Secret Santa presents.

A happy holidays from all here at StartWire, and don’t be like Ted (unless it’s hilarious)!

Job Search Intelligence for 2016

December 11th, 2015 No comments

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What do a nurse, developer and truck driver have in common?

No, it’s not the setup to a corny punchline–they have the most in demand jobs of 2016.

According to a recent report by Fast Company, these three very different fields will be looking to hire in 2016. Healthcare workers, software developers, and truck drivers will be areas where industry trends could contribute to a hunger for more candidates.

Looking to make a career change in 2016? This new trend bodes well for those looking to change careers–a work history different than the requirements will make less of a difference.

This also is a positive development for job seekers new to the economy, who may find that the stringent requirements of job listings in recent memory will relax in their favor.

Read the full report for details, as well as the top 10 growing occupations for 2016.

Ready to organize your job search in 20016? Then we recommend checking out StartWire.

Happy Thanksgiving from StartWire!

November 25th, 2015 No comments

Turkey - ThanksgivingWith Thanksgiving approaching and heralding the holiday season, many job seekers grow discouraged and put their search on hold until the New Year. It makes sense at first–with people getting ready for the holidays, job seekers conclude that it’s nigh impossible to get in front of a hiring manager.

What if instead of putting your search on hold, you changed your tactics a bit?

The holidays are a fabulous time to network. With food and cheer aplenty, take advantage of the good feeling and tap into your personal and extended networks. Relatives, friends, and friends of friends can all be good sources of leads in this time. Who knows, a casual chat at Thanksgiving could blossom into a referral.

The relaxing of businesses’ schedules can also be used to your advantage. Now is a great time to set up an informal meeting or tour around a workplace. A recruiter’s slower inbox can mean your follow-up email is more likely to stick–and get a response. Even reaching out with a season’s greeting is a great move!

Above all, have a great Thanksgiving–eat some good food, spend some time with the family, and don’t go too crazy on Black Friday.

A Salute From StartWire!

November 11th, 2015 No comments

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StartWire thanks our veterans for their service!

Whether you’ve recently been discharged or last served years ago, looking for employment as a veteran is different than as a civilian. Companies are taking notice of the unique skills and battle-tested talent of veterans, and many seek to recruit our nation’s protectors after their service is done.

On April 13th, 2015, the Military Times released their ranking of the best employers for veterans. Major companies like Verizon, BAE, and Lockheed Martin all have sterling policies when it comes to recruiting and hiring veterans.

The whole list comprises a variety of fields and industries, including telecommunications, defense, energy, and even banking

No matter with what branch you served or your plans for civilian life, the perfect job is out there waiting for you!

 

Categories: Job Search Advice Tags:

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