Family Peer Support Services (Service Provider)- CFTSS
SD012
 Queens, NY

SPECIFIC RESPONSIBILITIES

  • Services are to provide a structured strength-based relationship between the FPA and the parent/family member/caregiver for the benefit of the child/youth.
  • Services are delivered in a trauma informed, culturally and linguistically competent manner.
  • Timely and accurate documentation of contacts, in addition, progress notes are due within 3 days of service provision so that approval from supervisor is completed by the 5th business day following service provision.
  • Engagement, Bridging, and Transition Support:
    • Servicing as a bridge between families and service providers, supporting a productive and respectful partnership by assisting the families to express their strengths, needs and goals.
    • Based on the strengths and needs of the youth and family, connecting them with appropriate services and supports. Accompanying a family when visiting programs.
    • Facilitating meetings between families and service providers.
    • Assisting the family to gather, organize, and prepare documents needed for specific services.
    • Addressing any concrete or subjective barriers that may prevent full participation in services.
    • Supporting and assisting families during stages of transition, which may be unfamiliar (e.g., placements, in crisis, and between service systems etc.).
  • Self-Advocacy, Self-Efficacy, andEmpowerment:
    • Coach and model shareddecision-making and skills that support collaboration, in addition to providingopportunities for families to self-advocate.
    • Supporting families to advocate onbehalf of themselves to promote shared decision-making.
    • Ensuring that family members informall planning and decision-making.
    • Modelingstrength-based interactions by accentuating the positive.
    • Supporting the families in discovering their strengths and concerns. Assist families to identify and set goals and short-term objectives.
    • Preparing families for meetings and accompany them when needed.
    • Empowering families to express their fears, expectations, and anxieties to promote positive effective communication.
    • Assisting families to frame questions to ask providers.
    • Providing opportunities for families to connect to and support one another.
    • Supporting and encouraging family participation in community, regional, state, national activities to develop their leadership skills and expand their circles of support.
    • Empowering families to make informed decisions regarding the nature of supports for themselves and their child through:
      • Sharing information about resources, services, and supports and exploring what might be appropriate for their child and family.
      • Exploring the needs and preferences of the family and locating relevant resources.
      • Helping families understand eligibility rules.
      • Helping families understand the assessment process and identify their childs strengths, needs and diagnosis.
  • Parent Skill Development:
    • Supporting the efforts of families in caring for and strengthening their childrens mental and physical health, development, and well-being.
    • Helping the family learn and practice strategies to support their childs positive behavior.
    • Assisting the family to implement strategies recommended by clinicians.
    • Assisting families in talking with clinicians about their comfort with their plans of care.
    • Providing emotional support for the family on their parenting journey to reduce isolation, feelings of stigma, blame, and hopelessness.
    • Providing individual or group parent skill development related to the behavioral and medical health needs of the child (i.e., training on special needs parenting skills).
    • Supporting families as children transition from out-of-home placement.
    • Assisting families on how to access transportation.
    • Supporting the parent in their role as their childs educational advocate by providing: information, modeling, coaching in how to build effective partnerships, and exploring educational options with families and school staff.
  • Community Connections and Natural Supports:
    • Enhancing the quality of life by integration and supports for families in their own communities.
    • Helping the family to rediscover and reconnect to natural supports already present in their lives.
    • Utilizing the families knowledge of their community in developing new supportive relationships.
    • Helping the family identify and become involved in leisure and recreational activities in their community.
    • In partnership with community leaders, encouraging families who express an interest to become more involved in faith or cultural organizations.
    • Arranging support and training as needed to facilitate participation in community activities.
    • Connecting groups with families to strengthen social skills, decrease isolation, provide emotional support, and create opportunities for ongoing natural support.
    • Working collaboratively with schools to promote family engagement.
  • Development and updating of service plans, including obtaining medical consenter signatures.
  • Obtaining consents and enrollment documents for newly enrolled children/youth.
  • Attend monthly waiver service provider meetings to stay current on practices and protocols.
  • Submit progress notes, service plans, expense logs, and service provider logs within set forth-required timeframes.
  • Report incident(s) to supervisor upon discovery.
  • Maintain open communication with other service providers (e.g., Care Manager) to report on child/youths progress and identify any potential barriers and referrals.
  • Setting of Service Provision:
    • Family Peer Supports Services can be provided in a variety of settings, including community locations, the family or caregivers home, or where the child/youth lives, works, attends school, engages in services, and/or socializes.

QUALIFICATIONS

  • Family Peer Support will be delivered by a New York State Credentialed Family Peer Advocate (FPA). To be eligible for the FPA Credential, the individual must:
    • Demonstrate lived experience as a parent or primary caregiver who has navigated multiple child serving systems on behalf of their child(ren) with social, emotional, developmental, health and/or behavioral healthcare needs.
    • At a minimum, have a high school diploma, high school equivalency preferred or a State Education Commencement Credential. This educational requirement can be waived by the State if the person has demonstrated competencies and has relevant life experience sufficient for the peer credential.
    • Complete Level One and Level Two of the Parent Empowerment Program Training for Family Peer Advocates or approved comparable training.
    • Submit three letters of reference attesting to proficiency in and suitability for the role of a Family Peer Advocate (FPA) including one from the FPAs supervisor.
    • Document 1000 hours of experience providing Family Peer Support Services.
    • Complete 20 hours of continuing education and renew their FPA credential every two years.
  • A FPA may obtain a provisional credential that will allow services they provide to be billed if the applicant has:
    • Demonstrated lived experience as a parent or primary caregiver who has navigated multiple child serving systems on behalf of their child(ren) with social, emotional, developmental, health and/or behavioral healthcare needs.
    • A high school diploma, high school equivalency preferred or a State Education Commencement Credential. This educational requirement can be waived by the State if the person has demonstrated competencies and has relevant life experience sufficient for the peer credential.
    • Complete Level One of the Parent Empowerment Program Training for Family Peer Advocates or approved comparable training.
    • Submit two letters of reference attesting to proficiency in and suitability for the role of a Family Peer Advocate (FPA).
    • Agree to practice according to the Family Peer Advocate Code of Ethics.

An FPA with a Provisional Family Peer Advocate Credentialmust complete all other requirements of the Professional Family Peer Advocatecredential within 18 months of commencing employment as a FPA.

OR

Family Peer Support will be delivered by a CertifiedRecovery Peer Advocate (CRPA) with a Family Specialty. To be certified asCPRA-Family, the individual must be at least 18 years of age and have thefollowing:

  • Demonstrate lived experience as a primary caregiver of a youth who has participated in (or navigated) the addiction services system. They provide education, outreach, advocacy, and recovery support services for families seeking and sustaining recovery on behalf of a child or youth.
  • Have a high school diploma or General Equivalency Degree (GED) preferred or a State Education Commencement Credential.
  • Complete a minimum of 46 hours of content specific training, covering the topics: advocacy, mentoring/education, recovery/wellness support, and ethical responsibility.
  • Document 500 hours of related work or volunteer experience.
  • Provide evidence of at least 25 hours of supervision in a peer role.
  • Pass the NYCB/IC&RC Peer Advocate Exam or other exam by an OASAS designated certifying body.
  • Demonstrate a minimum of 20 hours in the area of Family Support (combined online and classroom training).
  • Complete 10 hours of continuing education per year of certification, including 2 hours of Ethics.